Magna Carta

Lines translated from the conclusion of Magna Carta

Wherefore we will, and firmly decree

That the English Church shall be free

And that the subjects of our realm shall have and hold

All aforesaid liberties,

Shall be free

All aforesaid liberties,

Shall be free

 

Rights and concessions

Freely, quietly,

Duly and in peace,

Fully, entirely.

 

Wherefore we will, and firmly decree

All aforesaid liberties,

Shall be free,

Forever, shall be free.

 

Wherefore we will, and firmly decree

All aforesaid liberties,

Shall be free.

 

For themselves and their heirs

From us, and our heirs

In all manners, in all places,

Forever,

Forever,

As has been said.

220px-Runnymede-americanbar-visit

Recorded by David Chilton at Essential Studios September 2014

 

Narration  Robert Blackmore

Voices       Lily Blackmore

                 Sue Casson

 

Piano        Sue Casson

 

In 1924 a young lawyer such as I thought of the rule of law as something unassailable: we imagined that the horrors and sacrifices of the First World War had not be futile, and that mankind  had at last learnt its' lesson and would henceforth live in accordance with reason.

 

What happened to theses fond imaginings? Every hope that we nursed was disappointed; reason was once more dethroned; one brutalising dogma after another bore dreadful fruit.

 

Yet there is a doctrine which has for various reasons become a little dusty and old fashioned in recent years and which I myself should like to see restored to the position that it used to occupy. I refer to the doctrine of law of nature.

 

'You may throw out Nature with a pitchfork,' said a Latin poet who was also a good gardener,'But she will always come back.'

 

David Maxwell Fyfe

Speech to the American Bar Association 1957 at Westminster Hall

on the occasion of their visit to dedicate a plaque to

Magna Carta at Runnymede

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Rebecca Morton and Lily Blackmore

Edinburgh Fringe 2014

untitled

Selected by Tom Blackmore

Set to music by Sue Casson